daily meditation: Refuge

B”H

March 20, 2020

(24 Adar 5780)

“Closing time, every new beginning comes from some other begining’s end.”

– Closing Time, by Semisonic

As we close the doors behind us, and shut ourselves in for the duration of this plague, let us recall the night before our first redemption, when the Angel of Death passed over the homes of B’nei Yisrael.

We who placed our trust in H’Shem, by obeying His commandment to place the blood of the Pesach lamb on our doorposts and lintels, while sheltering behind those doors. The prophet makes reference to this event, while speaking of another day.

“Come, my people, enter thou into thy chambers, and shut thy doors about thee; hide thyself for a little moment, until the indignation be overpast.”

– Isaiah 26:20, JPS 1917 Tanach

The sages liken the final redemption to the first redemption. As Egypt was inflicted by ten plagues, so will the world be subject to an even greater set of plagues. Those of us who trust in H’Shem may seek refuge in Him, within the confinement of our homes at this particular time in history.

By turning our hearts towards Him, we prepare ourselves for the redemption that is at hand. Although this may only be a forerunner of the ensuing judgment upon the inhabitants of the earth, we shelter in expectation of our freedom, when Moshiach will reign.

Additionally, while our hunkering down during this time period, may also only be a prelude to a greater need to seek refuge in H’Shem down the prophetic timeline, we trust that He will safeguard us.

“He concealeth me in His pavilion [sukkah] in the day of evil; He hideth me in the covert of His tent; He lifteth me up upon a rock.”

– Psalm 27:5, JPS 1917 Tanach

after Shabbat: weekly shpiel

B”H

motzei Shabbos shpiel:

It is interesting to note, that in Nesivos Shalom, a significant point is made in regard to the light of the menorah in the Mishkan. As is well known, this light represents the original light of Creation, that was hidden away after the Mabul (Flood). This same light is said to be revealed to the righteous at the time of Moshiach (Messiah).

Until then, we may glimpse that light on Shabbos, as well as receive its residual glow through observing the mitzvot (commandments), and diminishing the yetzer hara (evil inclination), not necessarily in that order. Rather “sur meira, v’asei tov – depart from evil and do good” (Tehillim [Psalms] 37:27). In this manner, according to Nesivos Shalom, we may enhance our sensitivity to the light.