Path of Kindness

B”H

Our proficiency as human beings is ultimately limited in comparison to the artistic rendering of Creation by G-d. Yet, many artists over the ages, as well as more contemporary artists, even photographers, and graphic artists have made the attempt, and continue to make a concerted effort to capture the essence of G-d’s creative expression. Additionally, all of us created beings should endeavor to imitate and internalize the qualities of G-d, in respect of our character, especially the thirteen attributes of mercy.

“And the L-RD passed by before him, and proclaimed: ‘The L-RD, the L-RD, G-d, merciful and gracious, long-suffering, and abundant in goodness and truth; keeping mercy unto the thousandth generation, forgiving iniquity and transgression and sin.”

– Exodus 34:6-7, JPS 1917 Tanach

By adhering to these attributes in our lives, the world will become a better place; personal changes, the ones shaped within ourselves, first influence the inner person, as well as one’s immediate surroundings, for example, family, friends, and community, before having an impact further outside that social and environmental milieu. The ripple effect, could permit even one act of kindness to make waves that effect others in ways that we may never know.

The Thirteen Attributes of Mercy, mentioned in scripture, are part of the liturgy for the Holy Days, requesting G-d’s forgiveness, as well as His mercy upon us. However, the prayer of the Thirteen Attributes has been added to the daily services, being performed three times a day at the Western Wall, specifically, to combat the plague of the corona virus. This prayer is considered to be a segulah – a remedy in times of dire need. Incidentally, this prayer is traditionally only said at the time of a minyan – quorum of ten.

Yet, these actual characteristics of mercy may be reflected in everyone’s life who takes the time to make the effort to imitate G-d with respect to His qualities. This may be done through forgiveness of others, a calm forebearance towards those who we find hard to bear, and mercy towards those whom we may feel do not deserve to be shown kindness. When we forgive and forget other people’s wrongs, as well as perceived slights against our character, we permit change to occur in ourselves and others for the good. A bruised ego, set aside, makes for the potential to overlook other’s faults.

“It is the discretion of a man to be slow to anger, and it is his glory to pass over a transgression.”

– Proverbs 19:11, JPS 1917 Tanach

harmony of harmony

B”H

tiferes shebbe tiferes

(harmony within harmony)

A completely harmonious soul, has the potential to be in harmony with others. Yet, even a balanced person, one who is “cool, calm, and collected,” will often meet with disharmonious circumstances in life. To remain compassionate in such situations, becomes a challenge. Even so, the greater harmony within a soul, the more likely that person will be able to meet the demands of challenging situations, remaining calm, for the sake of others. The inner quality of harmony is a result of integrity, soulwork, and balancing out one’s incongruous aspects into a sense of “wholeness.”

discipline within harmony

B”H

April 25, 2020

Counting of the Omer 5780

gevurah shebbe tiferes

(discipline within harmony)

Tiferes may also be rendered as “compassion;” perhaps, because an inner harmony is important, in order to be sincerely compassionate towards another human being. Therefore, in considering the significance of discipline within compassion, we may remind ourselves that a show of compassion without boundaries, as good as this may sound, may not always be wise. Rather, compassion should be shown in a selfless way to others, in measure with the required amount of kindness due to the recipient.

Think of some other examples for yourselves.